"Future Fun Conquest" a Digitally Created Art Show by Immo Jalass

 

This exhibition is now archived - it was active from April to August 2015. You can still view Immo Jalass' artworks on this page, but writing comments or giving feedback is no longer possible.

 

Our first exhibition features the German artist and creator of digital paintings, Immo Jalass. A pioneer in the realm of digital arts, Immo Jalass is one of the most successful artists in his field.

Immo Jalass about his work & this exhibition

Immo Jalass

Immo Jalass: I create free digital compositions which often start with one or two photographs, which are then ‘worked out’ with more or less 100 steps of copying and pasting; colouring; setting brush strokes, perhaps lines; some ‘decoloring’; ‘recoloring’; stretching; detailed form and color changing; copying one art piece into another one; making it transparent; giving some contrast; sizing and resizing, etc., until the image is complete and not one of the original photographic pixels is left. They are associations of the world around us and its reflections - often a kind of fantastic situation where everything seems to make a new kind of sense.

Some of the works make me look at them again, again and again, making me sometimes wonder how have I been able to create this ‘whatever’. Associating the world around me and reflecting my feelings means giving my interpretation. In the end, they are digitally created art works to be printed on high quality paper and presented with ‘Dibond’ (a strong binding material) and/or plexiglass in any size desired - or to be shown in digital frames.

All art works in this exhibition are available for purchase as TIFF files in high resolution, signed and together with all copyrights documented, allowing you to print and display in whatever form you like. — http://galeriejalass.tripod.com/

Manfred Schönebeck, Chancellor Carl Benz Academy, about the psychology of visual recognition and whether or not this can be applied to the arts

Manfred Schönebeck

Manfred Schönebeck, Chancellor Carl Benz Academy: As a psychology student, I conducted research on the visual recognition of objects (conceptualization) and found out that very blurred / abstract patterns for terms are produced in the brain. For example, what does the THE TREE look like in the brain, so that it can be used to identify all (very different) trees in the world with the term "tree"? It turned out that there must be a sequence of hierarchy to the blurred patterns that we use for recognition. Interestingly, the most abstract level of generic terms is the ‘preferred’ one in terms of the functioning of the brain. So, we recognize "tree" faster than, for example, “chestnut”. We called this fast (first) level of recognition, the ‘primary conceptual level’. It was also intriguing to learn that very concrete objects or people from our own individual surroundings can also be recognized on this primary conceptual level. That is, a specific friend (face, outline, movement) can be recognized immediately on the primary conceptual level on which "man" is usually recognized at first. Meaning that as humans, we have the ability to process one-step-recognition of things that are significant to us on a personal level.

The digital pictures of Immo Jalass appear to me like these blurred / abstract images which the brain produces for the recognition of the world. They appear to me somehow very familiar on the one hand, but also as if I've never even seen them from the "outside", on the other. And of course it's not “my” inner terms - but those of the artist, Immo Jalass. That’s what makes it so appealing. So to say, the artist allows a view into himself - which creates an intimacy. Or, it may also be that his own personal primary terms (which might be different from mine) – allow me to share his belief and compare mine emotionally.

Indeed – art, which is most certainly what Immo Jalass' work is, should not be rationalized. But I couldn’t help but wonder why his images are so appealing to me, as if they were somehow old and familiar. And I suppose that, when working on such a digital collage, he only has the feeling that it is finished at the moment when the external image is sufficiently similar to one of his internal ones. Only then he determines them to be “done”.

Interview: Immo Jalass

MANFRED SCHÖNEBECK, Chancellor Carl Benz Academy: Are you continuing to work on certain pictures when you look at them after a certain period of time?

IMMO JALASS: In my general, short description and introduction to this exhibition, I noted that my approach means that: “...in most cases I start with one or two photos...”. In the meantime though, it has been a long time since I started with a completely new photo. In fact, today there is already a huge stock of existing digitally created art works and more often than not, it happens that I go on working on already-existing pictures, from which new pictures are created. Furthermore, I am more often copying an existing picture into another already-existing art work, giving transparency to it, and thus making a completely new picture, where new forms and colors appear as if they were coming out of infinity. These new forms and pictures can end up taking forms and shapes that I myself, have not even thought of. Fortunately, as a digital artist I am able to go on working on an existing picture without losing the original (the first) picture. In this situation a whole new motif-sequence can develop.

MANFRED: You are talking about a fact that only exists in the digital art world – the dynamic development of an existing work, without destroying the original form, the prototype. But what defines an original art work of Immo Jalass?

IMMO: Each art work, each file is at a given moment, an original art work, or a prototype. Thus, many originals and more are coming. But it is only an original art work of Immo Jalass when it is dated and signed by me.

MANFRED: Is your creative process defined by the engagement of the full breadth of your feelings, or does your work arise from particularly relevant emotions of a time, that are associated with certain situations (like a happy phase, sad phase, bored phase)?

IMMO: I always try hard to involve the complete spectrum of my feelings whilst in the creative process and try to avoid specific, present-day emotions. I would even say that those ‘topical’ emotions are an obstacle to being able to create out of one’s full potential. In reflecting on your studies in psychology that we discussed earlier, I would like to say that less sharpness could mean more significance and more possibilities for associations... and I am always hoping that the spectator takes their time and is able to draw these associations.

MANFRED: Is the spirit of the age the weaving which consists out of the spirit of all humans?

IMMO: Something like a collective consciousness? A generally dominant meaning in political movements, the mainstream in all of our cultural forms? All that together - and even more.

MANFRED: Do you have pictures which are intimate, that you don't want to share with others?

IMMO: There were may be a few such pictures which I think of as being somewhat intimate, but I have destroyed them.

MANFRED: That's a pity! Are they really destroyed or are they still alive in ‘tolerable’ poor selectivity and transformed into new art works? Even hidden in abstractions they can produce enormous stimulus ...

IMMO: In the end there actually aren't any intimate pictures. I have consciously never worked out of any kind of intimacy whatsoever. In contrast, in many of my abstract works, when studied carefully, there are many curious forms, bodys and faces to discover or to associate. I myself like to look at many of them again and again searching for associations and expectations to existing forms of life.

MANFRED: Finally, do you approve of people - who cannot afford the originals - downloading copies of your pictures to their computers for their personal use (something that can actually hardly be prevented anyway)?

IMMO: I agree that the pictures can be downloaded if desired, in low resolution and not signed.

[UPDATE]: Immo Jalass - some questions and answers after the first 3 months

After the planned 3 months of this exhibitions have passed, our Chancellor Mr Manfred Schönebeck took a chance to ask the artist about his impressions and what he takes away from it.

MANFRED SCHÖNEBECK, Chancellor Carl Benz Academy: What did this solo exhibition in the virtual gallery of the Carl Benz Academy give to you? Are give and take balanced well enough?

IMMO JALASS: The exhibition was a great joy for me, it has broadened my experience, it brought new friends; but it also disappointed me. It could have been more of everything; visitors, feedback, comments, sales, new contacts, and so on.

MANFRED SCHÖNEBECK: Did some people get in touch with you after their visit to the gallery? What did you enjoy, what was annoying?

IMMO JALASS: All contacts took place in social networks. No direct contacts. Regarding pleasure and worries: Like I just said.

MANFRED SCHÖNEBECK: Why did you decide to pass the baton on to Laara WilliamSen?

IMMO JALASS: Oh, I did not pass the baton! I had e-mailed three of my friends and suggested the idea of this exhibition to them. Only Laara actually replied (well, Jeroen also sent a short note and wanted to get back later, but he didn’t do so), and I recommended her to contact you directly. So she did and you confirmed the exhibition, right?
Compared to my pictures, this will be something very different, of course.

MANFRED SCHÖNEBECK: Thank you, Immo! It was a terrific time having your pictures at the Carl Benz Academy – it brought good spirits to the otherwise, well, inanimate IT system. Thank you for your artworks as a loan to our virtual gallery!!!

http://galeriejalass.tripod.com/

[UPDATE]: Visitor stats from April to July 2015

After the planned 3 months of this exhibitions have passed, we want to share some insight about the audience with you - the audience!

A word about web tracking data

Data about visits to the gallery web pages and content objects was primarily collected using our own copy of the Piwik open analytics platform. The only exception from this data source are the ‘thumbs up’ and ‘thumbs down’ stats, which were registered using a specialized feature of our website software. We think the collected data gives a good impression of what’s going on in reality, but all insights should be taken with a grain of salt: E.g. the tracking and analytics system only records visits by human users (or at least visits using a “normal” browser software). Visitors (like you!) can, however, disable / opt-out of the tracking software. This will not leave a trace in our data.

Unique pageviews

Unique pageviews in the gallery - overview page only (blue); including picture detail pages (red)

(all figures are related to the time span from April 1st, 2015 to July 7th, 2015)

According to web tracking (Piwik) we had a total of 904 (23 of them using the Chinese language version) unique page views on pages in the /culture/exhibition*** path. 457 (18 in Chinese) of them happened on the gallery overview page, which means an average of 4.7 visitors per day. That makes our exhibition room a quite exclusive place to be, doesn't it? Whatever, the English language version was far more popular than the Chinese one.

447 (5 in Chinese) unique page views happened on the detailed views of single pictures – that means an average of 14.9 UPVs per picture. In reality, the most popular image was viewed 21 times, the least popular one 10 times. You can find the details in “Popular images” section on this page.

Origin and destination of visitors

Page transitions: Where did you come from, where did you go?

The majority of page views on the English language version of the gallery was coming in from external websites, most notable Mr. Jalass’ own gallery website http://galeriejalass.tripod.com/ (52% of 296 incoming visits!) – thanks, man! Facebook and LinkedIn also generated some traffic (~22%).

Internal Traffic mostly came from the news overview page (25% of 89 visits) - the opening of the gallery is mentioned there. Search engines were either not recognized as such or irrelevant (~ 2% of incoming traffic).

“Outgoing” traffic: The majority of visits (65%) ended with an “exit”, i.e. the visitors did not use links on the CBA website. 25% of the visits continued with another page of the CBA website; mostly detailed views of single pictures. No individual page received more than 6.2% of the subsequent traffic.

As a reference, the MBA program page (English version) received 38 unique page views in the same time frame; with no substantial (<9.2%) direct entry via gallery pages. Visitors who came for the gallery may or may not have visited the MBA page later, PiWiK’s simple standard analysis tools do not answer such question.

How did we get these figures? Well, the number of “views” reflects how often the “detail view” of each image was displayed to a visitor; counting only one of these views per session, i.e. once per visit to the exhibition space. We actually used a bit of a trick to equalize the benefits or drawbacks an image might have from its position in the gallery overview – the sequence of images has been randomized for each single visit(or)! You can still watch this happen if you use another device to visit the exhibition or if you clean all cookies in your browser and come back.

Votes: In the detail view of pictures you have ‘thumbs up’ and ‘thumbs down’ buttons to express your positive or negative impression of the piece of art. Technically, 83 votes were recorded in total. All of them were submitted from the English language version of pages. After simple sanitizing (double votes in a short time from the same session), 79 votes remained. According to a guest book entry there was a series of “3 or 4” accidental votes down instead of up – we found such a series in the related time and also excluded them from the subsequent analyses. After all, we considered 76 votes. In relation to 457 detail views this means that visitors gave feedback for 16.6% of the unique views.

In the list below the images are sorted by their ratio ‘Up votes’ divided by ‘Unique pageviews’ – i.e. the first entries are those pictures which had the greatest chance to attract a positive feedback when viewed in the large version. The ‘winners’ in terms of pageviews or votes are marked in bold.

Finally, we are well aware that number crunching like this certainly is not the most adequate way to approach the arts – so please enjoy the pictures, first of all!

97triedviews
   17 views   

asrevolved3b
   15 views   

already307
   12 views   4 

asdirected1a
   12 views   4    1 

95freeviews
   16 views   

wayset2
   16 views   

4visions
   10 views   3 

alateland
   16 views   4 

urbansshift1da
   13 views   3 

anartscene4de
   10 views   2 

sacred
   21 views   4 

aspectsfocussed1b
   12 views   2 

asassociated1da
   19 views   3 

wildfacing
   19 views   3 

polderup
   13 views   2    1 

asappeared70
   20 views   3 

converts1
   15 views   2 

asfigured1
   16 views   2 

condensedlands
   16 views   2 

condensedlands2a
   17 views   2 

associatedfacing
   12 views   1 

2openviews
   14 views   1 

urbanscan
   14 views   1 

hiddenforces
   15 views   1 

scapecheck4a
   15 views   1 

abstractedurbans
   16 views   1 

streetview2
   16 views   1    1 

3thoughtviews
   18 views

ahumancheck
   11 views

urbans1j
   11 views

 

Click on one of the preview images to see a larger version.

condensedlands2a

urbans1j

polderup

95freeviews

abstractedurbans

anartscene4de

hiddenforces

associatedfacing

converts1

condensedlands

scapecheck4a

3thoughtviews

4visions

alateland

urbanscan

wayset2

wildfacing

asfigured1

asassociated1da

streetview2

urbansshift1da

asdirected1a

97triedviews

already307

2openviews

asappeared70

aspectsfocussed1b

asrevolved3b

ahumancheck

sacred